Unveiling the Possibilities (Part 1)

For several years now, I have been studying the frilled, ruffled, pleated, and crimped veils of the 14th century.  In the fall of 2009, I made my first attempt – a veil which I have loved and worn and worn.  However, it was definitely a beginner’s attempt.

After examining dozens and dozens of images and reading every frilled veil article that I could get my hands on, I decided to make a second frilled veil in the fall of 2010.

This time, I decided to have the ruffle surround the entire veil perimeter, which was 235cm.  The next decision was about the style of the ruffle.  For this project, I made the decision to use a cartridge pleating technique.  As such, I experimented with 3 different pleating sizes: 0.5cm, 1.0cm, and 1.5cm.  After trying all 3 sizes, it was easy to choose 1.0cm as the best size for both width and spacing.

The next problem was to figure out the best method to mark for the pleats.  I decided to use pins instead of a modern marking pen as a possible method more authentic to the middle ages.  With 1cm pleats, 1,200cm of veil tape was needed – with 1,200 marking pins.

~Cristiana

Protégé Ceremony at Kingdom Arts & Sciences

This year’s Kingdom Arts & Science – Bardic Championship was an amazing experience. The morning started with a surprise when I was honored with a Jambe de Lion from the Crown of An Tir. After morning court, I had a great time judging the Children’s A&S Competition. An An Tir 5th grader made butter and cheese for the judges – and it was excellent.  She was a skilled presenter and the butter was very tasty.  🙂

Later, I was a student judge for a 14th Century Wool Dress entry.  This was a genuine learning experience.  I was impressed by the quality of the work and by the questions and observations made by the judges.  For me, personally, I was appreciative to have an opportunity to reflect on my own work and research in comparison to some of the phenomenal artists of An Tir.

The highlight of my day was becoming Baroness Brighid’s protégé.  We had a (thankfully) short, but meaningful ceremony. Again, I found myself honored to become a student to one of An Tir’s great peers.  What a significant year this has been for me.

Both of these images are © Talentus del Albero, who’s skill is brilliant.  I am in his debt.

~ Cristiana